Introducing Another Anna: Caranna Tyndall

So in yet another vision of insanity, I have agreed to play in a 4th D&D campaign. The 5E campaign ended badly at the hands of a large, pissed off dragon, and one of the regular Team Rowboat crew wants to try her hand at DMing again, so she’s going to be running a campaign on off-Sundays.

Yes, dear reader, this means that I will be playing D&D from 4-9:30ish (Team Rowboat, Antha Darkmore) on Saturday and 1:30-5:30 (Gods and Mortals, Ancelyn Blackstone) on Sunday one week, and then from 6-10 (City of Fangs, Anvari Zarthus) on Saturday and from 3 to 7 (Team Rowboat 2: Dragon Boogaloo, Caranna Tyndall) on Sunday the next week.

And that is just a LOT of D&D.

My newest character will be starting at level 12, because my previous character in this campaign met the love of her life and settled down, and I don’t want to break them up.

So everyone, meet Caranna Tyndall, half-elf cleric of Miruna the Comforting, the Goddess of Death.

Caranna Tyndall

Tamoko, by Artastrophe

Caranna is from the coastal city of Durcynnes, in the Southern City States, south of Surast and east of the Elven stronghold of Evenbright. Her father was an Elf of the Twilight, and a trader, and her mother a human from the city of Highgate. They met, later in both of their lives, in Durcynnes – a port city on the Crater Sea – and stayed there after their daughter was born.

Her mother died when Caranna was 12 of a wasting sickness, which Caranna also caught and died from. Her father, faced with the prospect of losing both his wife and his daughter within a week of one another, scraped together enough money to purchase a resurrection spell – but only one. He chose to revive his daughter, knowing that she – being of half-elven blood – would live to see him into his old age, where his wife would not, as she was approaching her silver years when she caught sick.

Caranna, however, was not the same child after her time in Miruna’s realm. Previously disinterested in her studies, she became more and more convinced that she was called to a life in the priesthood, having been given a second chance at life. Her father consented, considering her resurrection a favor done to him by Miruna, and Caranna entered the service of the Goddess of Death when she finished school at 16.

As a postulant at the temple, she learned to care for the dead, and as she grew in skill, learned to speak with the dead as well. Like all clerics of Miruna, she worked tirelessly with the poor, the disadvantaged, and the sick – shepherding them through the stages of their lives until they could rest peacefully in the folds of Miruna’s cloak after death.

Her primary goal is to create balance – balance between life and death, and balance between the living and the dead. She cares equally for both and is considered an expert at the rites to remember the various beloved ancestors in her family. She does not fear death, or the dead – knowing that once the dead know you’re afraid of them, they may try to take advantage of you.

She is calm and even tempered, conscientious and agreeable, and tends to ride the balance between tradition and improvisation, trusting to her skills and to her goddess when it comes to new and unexpected situations.

At 35 years old, she is now fully trained and no longer affiliated with the Temple in Durcynnes. From her father, she inherited a love of travel, and so has spent much of the last two years traveling the coast of the Crater Sea. She writes to her father often, and the two remain close. She also is very close to her deceased mother, who is peacefully resting in Miruna’s realm.

Just One Anna – Still Too Many Hobbies

So here’s a problem. I have three… okay four… okay five main “hobbies” (not crafts, but organizations and people) that I spend time on. I devote every Friday night to study group, every Saturday night and every other Sunday afternoon to D&D. I devote an occasional weekend, plus crafting time, to SCA. I take voice lessons every Tuesday. And I play video games on weeknights and most Saturday afternoons. All of these things take time. I want to be good at all of them. I want to keep doing all of them – or, in the case of the SCA, increase my involvement (I miss my SCA people).

However, there are only two non-work nights in a week. And I’m committed pretty much all weekend some weekends. And I have friends and people who are counting on me at all of these things. And I LIKE doing all of these things, and want to keep doing them, or do them more.

But… I can’t. This week I need to prepare handouts for study group, write a ritual for study group, read for study group, do my wizard chores in WoW, and finish rolling up a new pathfinder character for our Outrageous Dinosaur Campaign. I also need to continue to clean out my craft room so I can use it for SCA crafts again. My Sunday D&D character could use a few hours spent on background work, plus I need to work on her gear with our DM since we’re getting to a break point and I need to spend some cash on upgrades. My WoW characters could all stand to have some stories written about them. At least I can practice singing in the car.

And really, it’s gotten to the point where I’m just so overwhelmed that I don’t do anything, and then I feel like a flake for not doing what I said I was going to do.

So in the quest to make some serious decisions about my hobbies in 2015 (since “is it fun” is way too broad a category), I am going to try to prioritize for things with tangible results (not necessarily physical, but tangible) and skills that make me a better human. If it makes me more creative, more skilled, more compassionate, more thoughtful, more spiritual, or more knowledgeable, I’m all in. This puts study group and SCA and voice lessons higher up on the list than D&D and video games, but will hopefully leave me time for all of them, because they all tick at least one of the above boxes.

And no, I’m not quitting anything. No flailing at me. Just … making myself some priorities. We’ll see how well they stick.

So far, it’s working pretty well. When I have the energy, I’m doing more productive things, and when I don’t, I’m farming up transmog gear in WoW. Not a bad situation all around.